Iran, Israel, and the United States: Regime Security vs. Political Legitimacy

Iran, Israel, and the United States: Regime Security vs. Political Legitimacy

Iran, Israel, and the United States: Regime Security vs. Political Legitimacy

Iran, Israel, and the United States: Regime Security vs. Political Legitimacy

Synopsis

Providing an unbiased analysis of the past, present, and future of the hostile relationship between Iran, Israel, and the United States, this book presents an up-to-date discussion of the security implications for each of the two states as well as the entire region.

• Illustrates the complex relationship between Iran and Israel though an examination of historic events

• Provides a comprehensive bibliography of significant materials from the fields of history, politics, and international relations

• Includes an index of subjects, names, places, events, and related issues

Excerpt

In October 2010, U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg and Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Daniel Ayalon released a joint statement calling Iran one of the “greatest challenges” to stability in the Middle East and reconfirmed an U.S.-Israeli effort to prevent the country from developing nuclear weapons. “While today’s strategic dialogue covered many subjects, it is clear that Iran is among the greatest challenges we face today in the Middle East,” a portion of the text read. “Iran’s continued noncompliance with its international obligations related to its nuclear program, as well as its continued support for terrorist entities, are of grave concern to our two countries and the entire international community.”

The statement came at a critical time for U.S. foreign policymakers. Weeks earlier, Palestinian and Israeli leaders met at the White House and Pentagon to reengage in a long-awaited series of peace talks. Making good on a promise to vigorously engage these rival states in thoughtful, diplomatic dialogue aimed at finding a solution to end the years of their bitter opposition, President Barack Obama balanced the endeavor with other pressing policy decisions, including a drawdown and removal of permanent combat troops in Iraq and an increasingly obstinate quandary in Pakistan, where the Khyber Pass—a mountainous trail that connects Pakistan to Afghanistan—was shut off as Pakistani officials protested U.S. drone strikes. For the United States, this moment was critical. With no land route into the ongoing war in Afghanistan, ground operations would be limited. Two years into Obama’s first term, Middle Eastern policymaking dominated the West Wing.

Though the first days of talks between Israel and Palestine offered no glimpse of what would come, Shimon Peres, the Israeli president, offered . . .

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