The Praeger Handbook of Victimology

The Praeger Handbook of Victimology

The Praeger Handbook of Victimology

The Praeger Handbook of Victimology

Synopsis

Secularism, Theology and Islam offers a uniquely theological analysis of the historic Danish cartoon crisis of 2005-2006, in which the publication of twelve images of the Prophet Muhammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten ignited violent global protests. The crisis represents a politically, culturally, and religiously important event of the early 21st century, and Jennifer Veninga explores the important question of why the cartoons were published in Denmark when they were and why this matters to the larger global community. The book outlines three main interpretations of the affair as they were framed by international news media: as an issue exclusively about freedom of speech, as related to a 'clash of civilizations', or exclusively as a matter of international politics. Whilst these are important to note, the author argues that the crisis was far more complex than any of these interpretations suggest, and argues that an alternative methodology can be found in philosopher Charles Taylor's concept of the 'social imaginary', which refers to the shared norms, expectations, images and narratives of a community or nation that inform many of its shared practices. Describing the Danish social imaginary as paradox of Christianity and secularism, Veninga explains why the new presence of Islam has been perceived as such a threat to Danish identity. The author also maintains that despite tendencies toward exclusion, the Danish imaginary also supports a move toward authentic religious pluralism. Understanding the Danish cartoon crisis is important for any community struggling with new religious diversity, especially those with largely secular identities. Furthermore, the method used to examine the crisis provides a theological analytical framework applicable to a wide variety of contemporary social and political movements and issues.

Excerpt

The crime victim was “rediscovered” in the 1940s. With the coining of the term “victimology” in 1947 came the development of an interdisciplinary field focused on the study of and service to those who fall prey to the criminal offenses of others. The purpose of this book is to provide an overview of the origins and establishment of the field of victimology over the previous 70 years.

This handbook was written with the general public and college or university students in mind. The core of the book features 197 entries written by 95 contributors. Readers are provided an alphabetical and topical list of entries. The alphabetical list reveals the range of entries included in the book; the topical list offers insight into the major areas of focus within the field of victimology and how the entries relate to each other. Within each entry there is an explanation of the concept in light of how it relates to victims of crime. In addition, a suggested reading area is included in which readers may find other relevant sources. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the field of victimology, the contributors who wrote the entries come from 28 states representing 13 academic areas of study (e.g., criminal justice, criminology, gerontology, psychology, sociology, and victim studies).

In addition to the handbook, readers will find a chronology of selected victimology events and a resource guide that includes citations for books, a list of journals, and addresses for Web sites that relate to issues faced by victims of crime. Even the short biographies of the contributors and editor, found at the back of this book, are a resource for those who want to identify professionals who are . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.