Studied Ignorance: How Curricular Censorship and Textbook Selection Are Dumbing Down American Education

Studied Ignorance: How Curricular Censorship and Textbook Selection Are Dumbing Down American Education

Studied Ignorance: How Curricular Censorship and Textbook Selection Are Dumbing Down American Education

Studied Ignorance: How Curricular Censorship and Textbook Selection Are Dumbing Down American Education

Synopsis

Despite concerted efforts from our educators, administrators, and government, American education continues to struggle. The author of this work argues that the decline can be traced to censored curricula, inaccurate textbooks, test-driven evaluations, and increasing poverty among the student population.

Excerpt

How many times and for how many years have we heard the term “education reform”? When are American schools going to be competitive with the rest of the world, the developed and industrialized world in particular, and especially in science and mathematics? If I had a penny for every time I’ve heard someone talk about or discuss “education and school reform,” I’d be a very rich man!

Having said that, I am honored and delighted to be asked and to be able to write the foreword for Herbert Foerstel’s book, Studied Ignorance: How Curricular Censorship and Textbook Selection Are Dumbing Down American Education. In this thoughtful and well-written research-based work, Foerstel has made a strong argument that the American education system has been beholden to the textbook publishing companies and the whims of politicians who use education as a political bailiwick to perpetuate their agendas and careers. I believe that one of the most important responsibilities of a government is to educate its citizens, and much too often, in my opinion, our politicians have used education as a political issue rather than seriously looking into the real issues that guide our educational system. In addition, there is strong evidence, as this book points out, that the publishing companies have produced textbooks that are sometimes misleading, inaccurate, and written by people who are not authorities on the subject being covered.

I found one of Foerstel’s most penetrating insights right in the very first paragraph of his introduction where he writes, “More often than not, school reform has had little effect on classroom instruction and has . . .

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