Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom: How Pathological Labels and "Therapeutic" Drugs Hurt Children and Families

Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom: How Pathological Labels and "Therapeutic" Drugs Hurt Children and Families

Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom: How Pathological Labels and "Therapeutic" Drugs Hurt Children and Families

Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom: How Pathological Labels and "Therapeutic" Drugs Hurt Children and Families

Synopsis

This book offers a warning that American children are receiving increased chemical treatment from psychiatrists and provides a primer on how to improve the emotional health of kids without drugs.

"Maelstrom" is an apt metaphor for the inexorable deterioration many children experience inside the mental health system. Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom: How Pathological Labels and "Therapeutic" Drugs Hurt Children and Families challenges current treatment practices and addresses the critically important issue of excessive prescribing of psychiatric medications to children.

This encyclopedic work reveals "inside the system" information, emphasizing the theoretical divide at the root of the controversy over diagnosis and treatment. It explains how the 1990s, "decade of the brain" replaced talk therapy with biochemical treatments, leading to the hegemony of the pharmaceutical industry—and subsequently the massive drugging of children. Author Elizabeth E. Root details common diagnoses and treatments, explaining up-to-date brain research, with some surprising interpretations, and noting dangerous national precedents to mental screening. Finally, she illuminates pathways toward solutions and healthier families, sharing nonpsychiatric explanations for the nation's increase of troubled children and the rationale and research supporting non-drug, alternative approaches to childhood distress.

Features:

Rich use of case examples and clear explanations facilitates in-depth explorations of the most common pediatric "diagnoses," detailing why these are specious conditions.

A recommended readings section guides parents and caregivers to helpful resources.

Highlights:

Guides parents and caregivers whose families seek relief from emotional distress safely through avenues of help

Journeys inside and outside the mental health system for explanations and solutions regarding the increasing numbers of troubled children and youth

Reveals long-concealed dark truths about the mental health system that are largely ignored by mainstream media

Addresses the New Freedom Commission on Mental Health and its plan to screen all school children for mental illness, noting dangerous national precedents to mental screening

Excerpt

In Kids Caught in the Psychiatric Maelstrom, Elizabeth Root asks two questions that we, as a society, desperately need to think about. There has been an astonishing rise in the number of children and teenagers diagnosed with mental illness and treated with psychiatric medications in the past 20 years, and here is what she wants to know:

“Are these children really mentally ill?”

“Is the care we provide really helpful?”

Those are two separate, yet related questions. the first raises the specter of a medical discipline that tells children they have broken brains when, in fact, there is no evidence that is so. the second raises the specter of drug treatments that simply don’t work, even for those children who in fact may be depressed or extremely agitated and in need of help. Together, the two questions raise the specter of medical practices that are doing great and lasting harm to millions of children in our society.

Having raised the right questions, Elizabeth Root then answers them through a sober review of the research literature. She proceeds in a clear, logical manner. Is there evidence that children with adhd or bipolar disorder have “abnormal” brains? Does psychiatry have a biological test for diagnosing a mental illness? As she explains, psychiatry lacks such objective diagnostic tests, and thus it becomes easy to understand that psychiatry today is diagnosing many children as mentally ill who are, in fact, perfectly normal. Next, she turns her attention to a review of what the drugs do, and whether the scientific literature shows that they provide a long-term benefit. One might assume there is plenty of evidence to show that the drugs help children get better, stay well, and prosper in their lives, as otherwise psychiatry would have to admit that it was flying blind, a . . .

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