How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

Synopsis

Karl Ottfrid von Mller's translation of and commentary on Aeschylus' play The Eumenides, the concluding drama in the Oresteia trilogy, was first published in 1833. The play is a reenactment of the Greek legend of the trial of Agamemnon's son Orestes in Athens. Orestes' mother Clytemnestra had killed her husband, and as an act of revenge Apollo ordered Orestes to murder her. Orestes is hounded by the Eumenides (Furies) and travels first to Delphi to have his blood-guilt purified and then to Athens to seek the help of Athena. She decides that an impartial jury of Athenian citizens should decide the fate of Orestes, who is acquitted. Mller does not only deliver a translation of the play, but provides the reader with the tools for a wider interpretation by exploring the role of the chorus, the significance of the costumes and the composition of the play itself.

Excerpt

This book is about how globalization is taking place in a “fractured” manner and resulting in terrorism. I use the term fractured globalization to mean that as economic and technological forces push us toward the global, psychological needs pull us toward the local; as economic barriers weaken and dissolve, identity barriers loom up and become more rigid; as nation states join larger regional unions and we move in some ways closer to a global village, identity-based differences and particularly religious divisions magnify and we become in other ways more balkanized and more separated from one another. It is in the wider context of fractured globalization that we can better understand radicalization and terrorism associated with Islamic communities around the world. Such an understanding requires a macro, long-term view of human societies.

Another important consequence of fractured globalization I explore is a new global American dilemma. The first American dilemma arose out of contradictions between the rhetoric of equality, emanating from the Declaration of American Independence (1776) and other foundational American documents, and the practice of racial segregation. This dilemma was eventually resolved through desegregation legislation and changes in race relations from the 1960s. The new global American dilemma is rooted in contradictions between American ideals and rhetoric in support of democracy around the world, and U.S. government practices in support of “pro-American” dictatorships. The new global American dilemma was brought to a climax during the presidency of George W. Bush (2000–2008), when he authorized the invasion of Iraq as part of a “pro- democracy” agenda, and at the same time continued to . . .

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