Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change: Public Investment in Social Prosperity to Cool a Fevered Planet

Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change: Public Investment in Social Prosperity to Cool a Fevered Planet

Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change: Public Investment in Social Prosperity to Cool a Fevered Planet

Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change: Public Investment in Social Prosperity to Cool a Fevered Planet

Synopsis

This book presents an accessible and easy-to-follow argument that the climate crisis is a side effect of inequality and injustice, and demonstrates how strategies such as large-scale social investment will prove far more effective in reducing greenhouse gas pollution than cap-and-trade or other forms of free-market environmentalism.

Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change: Public Investment in Social Prosperity to Cool a Fevered Planet offers a new approach to battling the climate crisis, arguing that the massive waste that caused the current environmental crisis resulted not only from fundamental structural flaws in markets but also from social inequality, lack of democracy, and a deeply flawed foreign policy. Rather than providing the typical doomsday perspective, it offers realistic optimism about the expanding climate crisis, highlighting the convergence between the necessary steps to save the planet and what needs to be done to improve the lives of Americans.

The author's discussion of the United States's role in the climate crisis spans subjects as varied as the 17th-century forests of New England, the evolution of housework over 200 years, the American addiction to the automobile, the lettuce fields of California in the 1970s, and the Guano wars in 19th-century Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. This book will appeal to a wide range of readers, from the interested general public to students, academics, professionals, and other experts. The main section presents a clear and accessible survey of the economic, social, and political causes of the climate crisis, accompanied by potential solutions, while extensive appendixes offer in-depth and technical discussions.

Excerpt

Change is perennial within the American system of politics and government: the electoral calendar, the ebb and flow of presidential administrations, shifts along generational lines, and long-term patterns of partisan realignment—to name a few of the rhythms and cycles to be found in the political sphere. and so, one year’s innovative thinking can become the next year’s conventional wisdom, and then the following year’s stale orthodoxy. This book series, New Trends and Ideas in American Politics, focuses on the most important new currents that are shaping, and are shaped by, U.S. politics and government.

The early 21st century is a particularly important time to focus on a proactive approach to the participatory processes, governmental institutions, socioeconomic forces, and global contexts that determine the conduct of politics and the creation of public policy in the United States. the long demographic dominance of the Baby Boom generation has begun to recede as the Boomers age, even as society becomes ever more open and diverse along lines of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. From the waning of the worship of “the market,” to the disasters of the Bush era, to the unprecedented presidential election of 2008, to the steady emergence of a more multipolar and ever-less-certain global context, Americans are faced with new challenges that demand not simply new policies and procedures, but entirely new paradigms. At the same time, emerging vistas in biotechnology and information technology promise to reshape human society, the global ecological system, and even humankind itself.

New Trends and Ideas in American Politics casts a wide net, with volumes in the series unified mostly by novel, sometimes even counterintuitive . . .

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