Global Security Watch -- The Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia

Global Security Watch -- The Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia

Global Security Watch -- The Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia

Global Security Watch -- The Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia

Synopsis

Northwestern Africa, known as the Maghreb, consists of Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia, and Western Sahara. Recent changes in the political climate- including the collapse of the Libyan regime in October 2011 and structural factors, such as the decolonization of the countries within the Maghreb- have escalated violence in the area, exposing global powers, including the United States, to terrorist attacks. This is the first book of its kind to focus on the strategic planning of the United States, as well as other world powers, in the stabilization of the region.

Global Security Watch- The Maghreb: Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia examines domestic, regional, and international policies as they relate to the area's culture, geography, and history. Each of the book's seven chapters looks at the political and social stability of the land, and features a discussion on such topics as interstate relations, regional integration, conflict resolution, and the legislation governing security.

Excerpt

The question of security in the Maghreb region is no easy task because of the difficulty in obtaining information from security officials in the region who are always suspicious about discussing what they believe is sensitive information. This is probably the explanation as to why there has never been any work devoted to this subject in any language. Some scholars, such as Anthony Cordesman, have approached the subject from the military balance prevailing in the region. They have offered statistics on the armed forces and the equipment they have acquired from different sources. The websites of the different ministries of defense in those countries offer some indications as to the weaponry in the possession but have no publication on the security doctrines, at least not in any comprehensive perspective. There is little on the overall considerations regarding the Maghreb perceptions of security and the factors that the policy makers believe to be of the highest importance to their national defense. There are no public “White Papers” or “Security Strategy” publications. The few interviews we have conducted with officials give us a limited glimpse of only the security doctrines; we can only infer from public statements. There are also no reliable sources as to how security decisions are made or who makes them even if there is some indication as to who is in charge of security matters. Some well-informed journalists have reported on how some specific security issues are viewed by security officials; we have exploited some of them in the chapters in this book. We have done the same with well-researched academic articles, which we have cited whenever appropriate.

In this book, we have sought to look at security from its different angles which include, inter alia, human security, and those critical issues and threats that have affected the stability of the incumbent regimes. The uprisings, which have erupted cyclically, especially since 2010, inform on the strengths and the weaknesses of security in the Maghreb region, which today have intensified the threats, perceived or real, confronted by the regimes. As will appear in this work . . .

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