Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections

Synopsis

Levodopa-induced motor complications are extremely prevalent (affecting over half of all PD patients after 4-6 years of levodopa therapy), disabling, and one of the more challenging to treat of all PD symptoms. Motor fluctuations result in the re-appearance or a delay in relief of motorsymptoms, following levodopa administration. Motor fluctuations occur more frequently as PD progresses and "on" periods (when motor symptoms are well-controlled) typically get shorter and "off" periods (when motor symptoms re-emerge) get longer. Levodopa-related dyskinesia can also be disturbingand disabling. There are two major types of dyskinesia - "peak dose" and "diphasic" - which are manifested by variable sequences of parkinsonism, symptom improvement, and dyskinesia. Treatment strategies for dyskinesia include adjustments in the timing and dose of levodopa, the use of amantadine(an agent with dopaminergic, NMDA receptor antagonist, norandrenergic and possibly anticholinergic activity) and deep brain stimulation surgery. Part of the Oxford American Pocket Notes series, this volume is designed for general neurologists who are often the first physicians to receive complaints of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia in PD patients. This pocket guide serves as an invaluable resource in aiding in the recognition andmanagement of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, and ultimately, improving the overall quality of life of persons with PD.

Excerpt

In March 2006, Kinship Center, The Evan B. Donaldson Institute, and The Berger Institute for Work, Family and Children at Claremont McKenna College joined together to present a two-day conference “Biology and Beyond: Siblings in Foster Care and Adoption.” The conference was both well attended and well received. The seeds for this book were sown at that time. Many of the contributors to this book were featured presenters at the conference and agreed to have those materials included. Others suggested that the editors, Deborah N. Silverstein and Susan Livingston Smith, contact organizations or individuals who were not part of the conference to write for this book. The sponsoring organizations, the presenters, and the audience all agreed that the topic of siblings separated by adoption and foster care has received too little attention and that there is a widespread lack of agreement about the definition of the term “sibling,” a dearth of ethical practice guidelines about keeping siblings who might be separated by adoptive or foster-care placement connected, and a general lack of responsiveness to the concerns that have already been expressed. This book sets out to remedy, at least in part, some of those disturbing occurrences.

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care draws together some of the leading thinkers, researchers, and educators in the child-welfare arena to explore the issue from many angles and to offer a variety of perspectives and recommendations. The book contains 12 distinct chapters from Diane F. Halpern’s general overview of the complexity of the topic, to Smith’s review of the current research. Several chapters, Mary Anne Herrick and Wendy Piccus, Sharon Roszia and Cynthia Roe, Susan Thompson . . .

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