Radical Pathways: Understanding Muslim Radicalization in Indonesia

Radical Pathways: Understanding Muslim Radicalization in Indonesia

Radical Pathways: Understanding Muslim Radicalization in Indonesia

Radical Pathways: Understanding Muslim Radicalization in Indonesia

Synopsis

This book explores two of the most crucial areas of the war on terror: 1) why some Muslims turn to violent jihad, and 2) that process in the world's most populous Muslim nation, Indonesia. The recent history of terrorism in Indonesia has brought this country into the world spotlight: the Bali night club bombing by Islamists in 2002 was one of the worst terrorist attacks in history. The violence, unfortunately, continues: in 2008, radicalized Indonesian Islamic clerics have called for holy war against their compatriots who belong to the despised Ahmadiya sect (a group that believes there was another prophet after Muhammad). Written by an Indonesian native and expert in Indonesian security, "Radical Pathways" uncovers the reasons why this island nation is a hotbed of Islamic radicalism.

Excerpt

At 12:15 a.m., Indonesian time, on November 9, 2008, three Javanese men, Imam Samudra, Mukhlas, and Amrozi, members of a clandestine Indonesian-based but transnational terrorist network called Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), were shot dead by firing squad on the prison island of Nusakambangan. The three had been on death row since 2003 for their roles in the horrific Bali nightclub attacks of October 12, 2002, that killed 202 people—mainly young Australians. The 2002 Bali attacks had demonstrated the determination of JI to wreak havoc against Western governments and their Southeast Asian allies—and seemingly reinforced the notion that Southeast Asia was the “Second Front” in the George W. Bush administration’s Global War on Terror. To be sure, the Bali attacks compelled a previously complacent Indonesian government to take the threat of terrorism far more seriously. Since Bali, therefore, Jakarta, in concert with concerned regional governments, has devoted much attention and resources to neutralizing the JI network in Indonesia. Nevertheless, more than half a decade after that fateful evening in October 2002, it is clear that although JI in the Indonesian archipelago has been very much disrupted by concerted law enforcement activity, it is by no means finished. JI struck Jakarta in 2003 and 2004 and even hit Bali again in October 2005. Since then there has been a series of near-misses, with a much-improved Indonesian security apparatus thus far—as this book was going to press—proving adept at isolating and breaking up terror cells before they mount fresh attacks. The fact is that although the JI network in Indonesia has become heavily factionalized, it . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.