CliffsNotes on Sartre's No Exit and The Flies

CliffsNotes on Sartre's No Exit and The Flies

CliffsNotes on Sartre's No Exit and The Flies

CliffsNotes on Sartre's No Exit and The Flies

Excerpt

Many critics consider The Flies (Les Mouches) to be Sartre’s most effective drama. It deals with commitment and resistance, and the theme of freedom is woven throughout the play’s fabric. The play was produced in 1943, during World War II, and Sartre is lauded for having gotten his play past the Nazi censors; although on the surface this is a mythological drama, it is also a political and moral play about the plight of human slavery. Sartre wrote The Flies in keeping with his desire to “put on the stage certain situations which throw light on the main aspects of the condition of man and to have the spectator participate in the free choice which man makes in these situations.” The Flies is Sartre’s first play, written a year before No Exit, and it gave him his first popular opportunity, via the stage, to communicate his ideas to large groups of people who ordinarily might not have read his other works. This, for Sartre, was the best feature of the theater: It was a tremendous forum for disseminating his thoughts. It was, in the 1940s, the medium which served something of the purpose which television serves today.

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