The Military-Industrial Complex and American Society

The Military-Industrial Complex and American Society

The Military-Industrial Complex and American Society

The Military-Industrial Complex and American Society

Excerpt

This volume represents the work of more than 50 scholars in an effort to clarify the ambiguities of the U.S. Military-Industrial Complex. First identified in a speech by President Eisenhower in 1961, it had been in being from the earliest days of the confluence of American industrial capacity and international military commitment, specifically the Great War of 1914–1918. Organized at the highest level of government and industry, the Military-Industrial Complex was born of war and fed by American industry.

This project introduces snapshots of important individuals and organizations that built, organized, and even warned about the development and sustenance of the Military-Industrial Complex. Further, contributors provide information on important allied and enemy national capabilities that have shaped American responses in developing military technology. As well, there are vignettes on specific companies important to the Complex, treaties and agreements that have informed or limited American capacity, and wars that have shaped national security responses and weapons development. Finally, several entries discuss ideas that have shaped the Military-Industrial Complex such as the revolution in military affairs and current ideas on counterinsurgency.

The scope of this volume is intentionally broad. Chronologically, the entries begin with the birth of the American Military-Industrial Complex in World War I and build with its enormous growth during World War II. The bulk of the entries address the recognized Complex during the Cold War, and the continued development and evolution during that time. Arguably, the Cold War marked the apex of the Complex, based on the continual threat of global war and multiple regional conflicts. That said, even with the end of the Cold War, the U.S. Military-Industrial Complex continues, providing equipment for our military commitments at the same time as fodder for our news organizations. It is still with us, but has also evolved into the post–Cold War period.

In addition to outlining the history of the organizations and products, we have included entries on the social dimensions of the American Military-Industrial . . .

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