The History of Russia

The History of Russia

The History of Russia

The History of Russia

Synopsis

Where fresh water appears to be abundant and generally accessible, chronic pollution may be relatively ignored as a public issue. Yet there are those whose lives, livelihoods and traditions are touched directly by the destructive albeit essential relationship between humans and water. In her passionate and persuasively argued Where Rivers Meet the Sea Stephanie Kane compares two cities and nations - Salvador, Brazil and Buenos Aires, Argentina - as she tells the stories of those who organize in the streets, petition the courts, and challenge their governments to implement and enforce existing laws designed to protect springs, lakes, harbours and rivers. Illuminating the complex and distinctive cultural forces in the South Atlantic that shape conflicts and collaborations pertaining to particular waterfront settings, Kane shows the dilemmas, inventiveness and persistence that provide the foundation for environmental and social justice movements writ large.

Excerpt

Russia is a very large country with a long and complex history. This book provides a brief, accurate introduction to Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet history in a readable format that will be of use to high school students, college students, teachers, and nonspecialists. It includes major social, cultural, and economic developments so that readers new to the subject will come away with a good general understanding of this fascinating and troubled country. For those who wish further reading, the bibliographic essay includes some of the better known accessible works.

For those who grew up in the post–World War II United States, Russia (or more accurately, the Soviet Union) was a constant source of fear and attention. Secretive leaders in the Kremlin, the massive stone fortress in the heart of Moscow, had sworn to spread communism across the globe. At any time they might rain thousands of nuclear warheads on America. School children in the 1950s learned to “duck and cover”—to hide under their desks and put their hands over their heads in the event of a nuclear attack. U.S. taxpayers spent billions and then trillions of dollars on bombers, missiles, fighter aircraft, submarines, aircraft carriers, troops, tanks, and the other war paraphernalia to defend against the communist threat. Leftists and communist sympathizers were hounded and persecuted by Senator Joseph McCarthy’s House Un-American Activities Committee in the 1950s. The United States lost 58,000 men and rent . . .

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