Homeland Security and Intelligence

Homeland Security and Intelligence

Homeland Security and Intelligence

Homeland Security and Intelligence

Synopsis

Few issues are as important—or as controversial. Homeland Security and Intelligence offers a series of articles written to inform readers about changes in homeland security intelligence, to explain the new structure of the intelligence community (IC), and to enable readers to question the effectiveness of the new intelligence processes.

A brief history of intelligence in the United States covers past and current structures of the IC and the fundamentals of intelligence. There is an in-depth look at the new Fusion Centers and efforts to improve information-sharing among the federal, state, local, and private sectors. The book also addresses the critical questions of whether the IC is working as intended—and whether there is an effective system of checks and balance to govern it. Finally, there is an examination of issues that should be addressed for our future security. Each of the contributing authors draws on his unique experiences to provide the reader with a critical understanding of what has happened since 9/11 and where homeland security intelligence should be looking now.

Excerpt

Whenever someone mentions the discipline of intelligence, there is always a discussion of connecting the dots, which is part of what an analyst does. However, without the collector, there will not be any dots. Now consider that the dots are not always what they appear to be, nor are they static. Unlike those diagrams that we all completed as children when we were learning our numbers and letters, these dots move, change shape, change color, conflict with other dots that may change color, and sometimes disappear, then reappear in a different location. As children we were never confronted with two or three dots that had the same number or completed different figures. As the saying goes, “We are not in Kansas any more.”

Providing homeland security is about identifying, collecting, interpreting, analyzing, communicating, and using the dots to create intelligence that can be used by strategists, policy makers, and military/security/ police forces and leaders. We know that the post-9/11 years do not represent our first foray into intelligence. Nor did it start in 1947 after World War II with the creation of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense. For the United States, it goes as far back as our colonial days and our War of Independence, when we severed our relationship with Great Britain. George Washington was a strong believer in an intelligence program, and the results are obvious. Over the years, there have been highs and lows regarding our intelligence operations. While we have had many successes, we seem to remember those failures. There are two that stand out. The first was on December 7, 1941, in Pearl Harbor, and our most recent and significant failure was on 9/11 at the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

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