Daily Life in Colonial Latin America

Daily Life in Colonial Latin America

Daily Life in Colonial Latin America

Daily Life in Colonial Latin America

Synopsis

Women's fiction covers numerous topics of importance in the lives of women - friendship, love, personal growth and family relationships. For this reason, the genre is a hotbed of engaging subjects for book group discussions. A Book Club Guide for Women's Fiction brings together information on over 100 women's fiction titles, providing everything a book group needs to encourage focused, stimulating meetings. Reading Women marshals information that has been, up to this point, either nonexistent or scattered in book club guides. Readers will learn the difference between Women's Fiction, Romance, and Chick Lit, as well as why these genres provide a rich source of discussion for book groups. Specific entries cover titles from all three genres, offering an author biography, a book summary, bibliographic material, discussion questions, and read- alike information for each book. An additional 50 titles suitable for book group discussions are listed with brief summaries.

Excerpt

Two pivotal moments sparked my interest in and approach to this study. The first happened when I went to Guatemala to do the research for my dissertation. My topic was a rebellion of the peasantry, the campesinos, of a rural area of eastern Guatemala in 1837. I wanted to find out why they had put down their hoes and picked up anything that could serve as a weapon for several years, finally marching on Guatemala City where their young leader Rafael Carrera, known as “el indio,” formed the alliances that enabled him to threaten and later destroy the Republic of Central America. As I read documents of all sorts from that period, I began to notice that the true leaders of the rebellion were the men of several large extended families that owned many acres in cattle ranches. I searched for these men and their wives in court records, land surveys, purchase and sale agreements, wills, and baptismal and marital records, and I saw that many of them were categorized as mulato libre. Ethnicity in this part of Latin America in the early 19th century was mostly a matter of observation or phenotype, and various scholars have discussed the unreliability of these ethnic appellations in defining a person’s true ethnicity. Since Rafael Carrera became the first president of an independent Guatemala after the breakup of the United Provinces of Central America, there are pictures of him available, and, in spite of his nickname, his features appear at least as much . . .

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