Common Purse, Uncommon Future: The Long, Strange Trip of Communes and Other Intentional Communities

Common Purse, Uncommon Future: The Long, Strange Trip of Communes and Other Intentional Communities

Common Purse, Uncommon Future: The Long, Strange Trip of Communes and Other Intentional Communities

Common Purse, Uncommon Future: The Long, Strange Trip of Communes and Other Intentional Communities

Synopsis

When the Renaissance reached Northern Europe, Jan Vredeman de Vries (1527- 1604) ranked among its most influential advocates. His books of architectural engravings opened new avenues of invention, reflecting the era's artistic crosscurrents. Their combination of Northern and Southern elements forms a powerful expression of sixteenth-century Netherlands culture and constitutes a new style that spread throughout Germany, Scandinavia, and the British Isles.
This book, the last and greatest of Vredeman's works, perpetuated not only the Renaissance interest in perspective but also the important work done by Dürer, from whom Vredeman acquired much of his knowledge. These engravings include exteriors of architectural structures, Gothic interiors, gardens, medieval townscapes, and views into domes or vaults and down many-tiered stairwells. More than 70 plates offer a fascinating collection for any art lover.

Excerpt

The group of those who believed were of one heart and mind, and no one said that
any of his possessions was his own, but everything was held in common
.

—Acts 4:32

They just joining and dwelling together do easily agree on one fashion of living.

—Thomas More, Utopia

Freedom’s just another word for nothin’ left to lose.

—Kris Kristofferson, Me and Bobby McGee

How I Missed Woodstock

In 1969, my cousin and I picked up a hitchhiker while driving south from Montreal on the New York State Thruway. We had arrived in that most culturally complex of Canadian cities the previous day on an errand for my cousin’s friend. Not having the cash, either U.S. or Canadian, for a room for the night, we slept in the car. The next morning we left for home—which for my cousin, the driver of the moment, was Connecticut.

The hitchhiker was dressed in standard late 1960’s garb. Leather vest over bare chest, long hair held in place with a bandana. He said he needed a ride to a music festival not far down the road. He asked to be left off at any exit around Newburgh, which was where we intended to turn east toward Connecticut. But the hitchhiker’s enthusiasm for the festival was unbounded. “You gotta be there,” he said, offering a toke that both my cousin and I refused. Not a good idea when you are switching off driving chores.

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