The Inside Stories of Modern Political Scandals: How Investigative Reporters Have Changed the Course of American History

The Inside Stories of Modern Political Scandals: How Investigative Reporters Have Changed the Course of American History

The Inside Stories of Modern Political Scandals: How Investigative Reporters Have Changed the Course of American History

The Inside Stories of Modern Political Scandals: How Investigative Reporters Have Changed the Course of American History

Synopsis

Built from the ground up to focus on what matters to students in today's high-tech, globalized world, Dean Karlan and Jonathan Morduch's Microeconomics represents a new generation of products, optimized for digital delivery and available with the best-in-class adaptive study resources in McGraw-Hill's LearnSmart Advantage Suite. Engagement with real-world problems is built into the very fabric of the learning materials as students are encouraged to think about economics in efficient, innovative, and meaningful ways.

Drawing on the authors' experiences as academic economists, teachers, and policy advisors, a familiar curriculum is combined with material from new research and applied areas such as finance, behavioral economics, and the political economy, to share with students how what they're learning really matters. This modern approach is organized around learning objectives and matched with sound assessment tools aimed at enhancing students' analytical and critical thinking competencies. Students and faculty will find content that breaks down barriers between what goes on in the classroom and what is going on in our nation and broader world.

By teaching the right questions to ask, Karlan and Morduch provide readers with a method for working through decisions they'll face in life and ultimately show that economics is the common thread that enables us to understand, analyze, and solve problems in our local communities and around the world.

Excerpt

Jeff Greenfield

As the American newspaper more and more takes on the coloration of an endangered species, an intriguing argument has broken out in preparation for the postmortem: if the newspaper dies, will we be bidding goodbye to a creature that has outlived its time; or will we be losing something that is irreplaceable and critical to a free society?

There is, after all, nothing especially admirable about an information delivery system that requires the felling of countless trees, the transportation of wood, then paper, and then the newspaper itself across crowded streets via trucks that clog the roads and foul the air. and those of us who were poetic about that feel of the newsprint in our hands … well, how different are we from our ancestors who might have sighed, “You know, I really need to feel that papyrus under my hands as I unscroll the news”? Even if we are talking not about the form of the newspaper but the institution itself, perhaps it’s simply that the time has passed when the bundling of so much disparate information—comics, horoscopes, advice to the lovelorn, high school lunch menus, weather, national and international news, and opinion—was a sensible combination of data. Today, the sports comes via espn, the comics come animated, and opinions—unlimited in volume or ideology and covering the entire thoughtfulness–thuggishness spectrum—are free for the asking (whether you have asked for them or not). What then, might we lose if the newspaper dies?

Woody Klein’s book provides one powerful answer: for generations, the conglomerate nature of the newspaper, and its profitability, enabled reporters to devote great amounts of time, energy, and . . .

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