The Lion of Judah in the New World: Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and the Shaping of Americans' Attitudes toward Africa

The Lion of Judah in the New World: Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and the Shaping of Americans' Attitudes toward Africa

The Lion of Judah in the New World: Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and the Shaping of Americans' Attitudes toward Africa

The Lion of Judah in the New World: Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and the Shaping of Americans' Attitudes toward Africa

Synopsis

From the author of the 2013 Caldecott Honor Book , ONE COOL FRIEND!

Annie Grace wears her ?Adventure Annie? cape to her first day of kindergarten, and proceeds to barrel through the day, searching for adventure in every moment. Her interpretation of the class's Gold Star Rules isn't exactly what her teacher, Mr. Todd, had in mind. But somehow Annie does manage to save the day when two of her classmates get lost on their way to retrieve the afternoon snack. Spirited and funny, this is an introduction to kindergarten that will please kids and teachers alike.

Excerpt

Haile Selassie, the Emperor of Ethiopia, was an iconic figure of the 20th century, who came to embody the majesty of the African continent and its people in the minds of many Americans. Starting at least with his coronation as Ethiopia’s King of Kings in 1930, and continuing through the velvet revolution that overthrew him in 1974, the emperor was a well-known celebrity in the United States. In the years following World War II, Haile Selassie cultivated his nation’s friendship with the United States, and starting in 1954 he came to Washington on six state visits, the most of any reigning foreign head of state up until that time, and also traveled to many other destinations in North America.

His fame as an international celebrity was well earned. He won it the old fashioned way: by significant accomplishments. Wartime always produces new heroes, and before and during World War II, Haile Selassie was elevated into high visibility by being among the first to stand up to the European dictators, who shortly would wreak such worldwide havoc, and subsequently to champion an international order to prevent similar malevolence from threatening weaker nations again. At the League of Nations, the little king created, in image and in word, a composition of rich emotional eloquence. The Haile Selassie we see in the old newsreels is the one who registered on the national conscience and created a place for himself in the American heart that remained thereafter.

The emperor’s visits to the United States generated rapt attention from the media, and the wily monarch manipulated that coverage . . .

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