Politics and America in Crisis: The Coming of the Civil War

Politics and America in Crisis: The Coming of the Civil War

Politics and America in Crisis: The Coming of the Civil War

Politics and America in Crisis: The Coming of the Civil War

Synopsis

Get ready to learn all about reading! The fun and interactive pages in Learn About Reading help your child prepare for first grade reading readiness with a variety of skills, including identifying consonant and vowel sounds; beginning and ending blends; recognizing nouns, verbs, and adjectives; as well as early reading comprehension and story sequences.

Each 32-page workbook in the Learn About series is designed to provide a fun learning experience. The broad selection of topics appeals to a wide range of young learners and parents, and each workbook features engaging, interactive activities and easy-to-follow directions. The colorful covers and grade-appropriate content make this series an excellent tool.

Excerpt

By the mid-1840s, the United States looked to be a vital, prosperous republic. In many ways, the reality matched the appearance. With the Panic of 1837 ending, the economy was emerging from its doldrums. The Louisiana Purchase, treaties with England and Spain, and the tragic removal of Native Americans from the Southeast to lands west of the Mississippi made plenty of land available for farming, industry, and migration. In 1845, newspaperman John L. O’Sullivan wrote of “our manifest destiny to overspread and to possess the whole of the continent which Providence has given us for the development of the great experiment of liberty and federated selfgovernment entrusted to us.” Few white Americans would have disputed him. The republican ideals that produced the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the idea of self-government found their way into Latin America, where revolutions drove out the Spanish Empire in the 1810s and 1820s. At the same time, European countries like England and France extended voter participation in ways similar to the United States. For the nation and its beliefs to move beyond their existing boundaries seemed only logical.

But this series of successes did nothing to obscure the divisions in American society. In 1820 and 1833, compromises in Congress had settled disputes between the North and South that had reminded Americans of the tenuous quality of their Union. Since then, Texans had won independence from Mexico and wanted to join the United States, but the presence of slavery in their vast territory made their goal a hot-button issue that politicians were reluctant to press. Democrats and Whigs, and the regions from which they came, were divided not only against one another, but also among themselves. The threads that held each party together were thin and getting thinner. Northerners in both parties—especially the Whigs—had long since tired of acceding to the South’s wishes over slavery. Both parties also worried whether Manifest Destiny meant spreading both republican ideals and the institution of slavery—and whether they could accept that contradiction.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.