Running the Border Gauntlet: The Mexican Migrant Controversy

Running the Border Gauntlet: The Mexican Migrant Controversy

Running the Border Gauntlet: The Mexican Migrant Controversy

Running the Border Gauntlet: The Mexican Migrant Controversy

Synopsis

In 2008, the United States allocated $3.5 billion for border patrol and $1 billion for the construction of a 700-mile fence between the United States and Mexico. The fence is unfinished, and the border remains a locus of anxiety-and often deadly struggle-as the drug war rages and jobs in both nations continue to disappear.

Excerpt

The United States and Mexico share a long and complex history, one that is not often portrayed in a favorable light in the popular press or media. Here we attempt to provide a more balanced perspective on U.S./Mexico relations, providing a clearer picture of this symbiotic relationship that extends to the early 19th century. This relationship also helps articulate the nature and extent of American imperialism fostered under the guise of divine providence (white supremacy) and Manifest Destiny (primacy over inferior humans, notably American Indians and Mestizos), including events leading to the U.S. Civil War. White supremacy was seen as the birthright of white, Anglo-Saxon Protestant (WASP) colonial separatists, setting the stage for class and caste divisions in the new American republic as well as providing the justification for U.S. imperialistic gains and influence—first in the Americas and later in the Pacific Islands.

The 13 original colonies were unlike other British colonies that eventually gained their independence in that the United States was the only one to emulate the same imperialistic behaviors that it claimed to abhor and used as a justification for its revolt against England. Moreover, the United States was the only former colony in the Americas to aggressively interfere in the sovereignty of other nations in the hemisphere (Monroe Doctrine), those who also successfully gained their independence from their European colonizers (France, Spain, Portugal …).

Furthermore, it is clear that the freedoms articulated in the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution were not for all persons residing in the new republic but for a select privileged group of adult white males. Ironically, the most conservative justices currently serving on the U.S. Supreme Court (Chief . . .

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