The Spirituality of Sex

The Spirituality of Sex

The Spirituality of Sex

The Spirituality of Sex

Synopsis

This book describes the psychospiritual facts of life about the pervasiveness of sexuality in all aspects of human life. It is not a "how to" manual so much as a description of the deep meaningfulness that can be found in the spirituality of sex. It is designed to enlighten us about ourselves, to give names to what we all feel all the time and do not know quite how to describe. It is about savoring the spiritual flavor of sexual play and sexual union. This is a book for everyone, from the inquiring adolescent to the mature adult looking for what is missing in sex and relationships. This is not a book mainly for Christians or Jews. It is about the generic human spirituality in every one of us, true believer and atheist alike. It is about being human more fully and with greater satisfaction.

Excerpt

When students approach me with questions about sexuality, I instinctively refer them to my colleague, Robert Dykstra, who teaches our courses on sexuality at Princeton Theological Seminary. When I assigned my own book, A Time to Laugh, in a class, I pointed out the model of the person depicted in a rather crude drawing of my own, a “self-portrait,” and noted that it located the self-center in the brain, the spirit-center in the heart, and the soul-center in the liver. I suggested to the class that there was something missing in this picture because it ended at the waist: “There’s no sex-center!” I suggested that if anyone wanted to learn about the fourth center of the person, they should take a course from my colleague, Robert Dykstra.

When J. Harold Ellens asked me to write this foreword, my initial instinct was to suggest that he get my colleague, Robert Dykstra. He is a lot more interested in sex than I am. But then I began to feel a quiver in my liver, which told me that it was time to do a bit of soul -searching: Why do I wish to hold the topic of sex at arm’s length? Why do I focus on organs above the waist and leave those below the waist to others?

So I agreed to write this foreword. I rationalized my agreement on the grounds that there must be others out there who might feel the same as I do about the subject. Maybe, I thought, a foreword written by someone such as I would actually serve the interests of the author and publisher in ways that a foreword by someone who has an easy familiarity with the topic would not. My self -center in the brain found this argument relatively persuasive, and my spirit -center in the heart got on board with it too, so before long all three of me were of one accord.

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