A Great and Terrible World: The Pre-Prison Letters 1908-1926

A Great and Terrible World: The Pre-Prison Letters 1908-1926

A Great and Terrible World: The Pre-Prison Letters 1908-1926

A Great and Terrible World: The Pre-Prison Letters 1908-1926

Excerpt

A collection of letters is also essentially a biography – here of a man recognised as one of the twentieth century’s leading thinkers. Despite the long crisis afflicting the left in the traditional industrialised world, Gramsci’s reputation has remained unscathed and indeed has been enhanced. Concepts he developed in prison, often encountered in this selection in their first formulations, have been taken up and applied to effect by many outside the bounds of the left, sometimes in areas of the world and in fields that would not have been guessed at in his time. The present volume fleshes out what the Englishspeaking world knows of him, both politically and personally, through the widely available Prison Letters, Fiori’s standard, but by now rather old, biography and Davidson’s intellectual biography.

A wide selection of Gramsci’s pre-prison letters – around two thirds of those currently known – is here offered, covering the period up to his arrest by the fascist regime in November 1926. Since the publication of Antonio A. Santucci’s Italian edition of the pre-prison letters that were known in the early 1990s (Gramsci 1992), and even since the first two volumes of correspondence in the prestigious ongoing Italian National Edition of Antonio Gramsci’s Writings (Gramsci 2009 and 2012), further letters and documents have emerged from various archives, and are still emerging (though those that are still of uncertain attribution are not included here). Some letters are published here either for the first time in any language or shortly after their first Italian appearance. When there is an overlap of content with others previously known, precedence has been given to these newly-found letters; and unnecessary duplication has also been avoided elsewhere in the selection, while at the same time all letters are published in the fullest text available, excepting that Party and Comintern protocol numbers have been omitted.

Unlike the Prison Letters, Gramsci’s pre-prison correspondence discusses events then happening. This introduction and the endnotes . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.