Marx in London: An Illustrated Guide

Marx in London: An Illustrated Guide

Marx in London: An Illustrated Guide

Marx in London: An Illustrated Guide

Excerpt

Thousands of visitors to twentyfirst century London, coming from all parts of the world, are interested in seeing the places in the city with which Marx was particularly associated in his life time; not surprisingly, therefore, this book is not the first of its kind. As early as 1948, a booklet, London Landmarks, was published to commemorate the centenary of the Communist Manifesto (republished in 1963). Since it was likely to soon go out of print, and to celebrate the centenary of Marx’s death, in 1982 I wrote Marx in London: An Illustrated Guide, in conjunction with a series of television programmes, with John Dekker, John Mair and Ian Taylor as producers. It was translated into several languages.

This new Guide, written collaboratively with John Callow, Librarian of the Marx Memorial Library, is intended not only for visitors to London from overseas but for British visitors to London who are still looking for the missing Marx, and, equally important, for readers of Marx wherever they live, many of whom may not be able to travel to London but who are concerned to find out more about his life in the city, a more complex life than his writings may suggest.

The guide sets out useful information, both biographical and typographical, and is fully illustrated with photographs, maps and other illustrations, many of them new; some of them show how the places which Marx knew best have changed since his death in 1883. It deals also with some of Marx’s communist successors, who had their own connections with London. These include Vladimir Ilych Lenin, who in 1901–1902 shared an editorial office at 37/38 Clerkenwell Green, now Marx House (the home of the Marx Memorial Library), from which he published a series of issues of Iskra, the Russian Social Democratic newspaper.

This new Guide has been published through Marx House just as the 1982 Guide was published through the BBC. Without the enterprising initiative of my co-author, John Callow, who appreciated the potential in a new volume on Marx in London and has followed his own . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.