The Making of Adolf Hitler: The Birth and Rise of Nazism

The Making of Adolf Hitler: The Birth and Rise of Nazism

The Making of Adolf Hitler: The Birth and Rise of Nazism

The Making of Adolf Hitler: The Birth and Rise of Nazism

Synopsis

The harsh Armistice terms of 1918, the short-lived Weimar Republic, Hindenburg's senile vacillations, and behind-the-scene power plays form the backbone of this excellent study covering German history during the first three-and-a-half decades of the century.

Excerpt

In 1920 I met hime, a strange oddball, at the home of my friend Clemens zu Franckenstein, who was then living in the Lenbach villa. According to the butler, Anton, the man simply would not go away and had been waiting for an hour. And there he was! He had gotten into Cle’s house (Clé, up to the time of the Revolution, had been general manager of the Royal Theater) by saying he was interested in operatic scene designing, which he apparently thought was related to his former profession of decorator and paperhanger. A still completely unknown outsider, he had arrived, so to speak, en pleine carmagnole, dressed up for his visit to the home of a man he had never met in riding leggings, a riding whip, and a slouch hat and accompanied by a shepherd dog. He looked, as a result, among the Gobelins and cool marble walls, very much like a cowboy who had thought it proper to appear in leather pants, enormous spurs, and a Colt to take a seat on the steps of a baroque altar. So, looking haggard and even a little starved, he sat there with the face of a stigmatized headwaiter, as delighted as he was inhibited to be in the presence of a real live Herr Baron, so awed he dared to sit uneasily on only half of his ascetic backside, snapping at the kindly but cool, incidental remarks of the host the way a starving cur goes at a piece of meat thrown to him. After some random talk he took over the conversation and began to preach like a division chaplain. Without any kind of argument from us, apparently in unconscious memory of the acoustics of the Zirkus Krone, he attained such a volume of bellowing that finally Franckenstein’s household personnel, fearing a scene between host and guest, converged on the room to protect my friend. After he left, we sat together silently . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.