North American Homeland Security: Back to Bilateralism?

North American Homeland Security: Back to Bilateralism?

North American Homeland Security: Back to Bilateralism?

North American Homeland Security: Back to Bilateralism?

Synopsis

This anonymous work was published at the end of the First Anglo-Maratha war (1775–1782) to provide an English audience with a better understanding of the recent conflict. The author (who may have been a Major John Scott, and is likely to have been connected to the East India Company) is at times quite critical of the Company and some of the decisions which were made in relation to the conduct of the war. He suggests that India-based employees were not always giving the whole picture to the directors in England. He argues that war could have been avoided (blaming Warren Hastings, the governor-general of Bengal, for its outbreak),and that Britain had done badly out of negotiations for peace. The book is an early source of information about the Indian states which were soon to become incorporated into British India, and on Anglo-Indian relations.

Excerpt

When the world’s largest economy shuttered its borders on 9/12 for the first time in the modern era, its top two trading partners, Canada and Mexico, were not only directly and brutally impacted, but also faced increasing security filters thereafter. Had a different era in cross-border North American relations begun? On the one hand, the dhs (Department of Homeland Security) was established as the central agency in the largest administrative overhaul since World War II to keep not only the United States safe, but also revive a wider security community. On the other hand, based on the Washington Consensus, free trade movement in the Western Hemisphere independently reached its own crossroads: As the United States looked beyond nafta (North American Free Trade Agreement) toward a cafta (Central American Free Trade Agreement) in 2003, the ftaa (Free Trade Area of the Americas) initiative grinded almost to a halt. Were trade thrusts impeded by 9/11 restrictions, if not directly, then indirectly? Canada and Mexico were left with fewer options vis-à-vis their giant neighbor: Under a neoliberalist drive, Canada proposed free-trade to the United States in 1985, with Mexico following suit in 1990, only to have a post–Cold War security threat suddenly haunting them both. It was not so much a question of whether they would join their overwhelmingly largest trading partner in securing common frontiers, but whether regional commitments would continue with sincerity and priority or become superficial.

How Canada and Mexico responded to the dhs establishment leads first to a country-specific study of 9/11 policy responses across North America, then to appraising the region’s three bilateral relations, highlighting security and intelligence, before exploring trilateral possibilities. Driven by theoretical tenets from integration, interdependence, and realism, the volume examines North America’s guns-butter trade-off under full theoretical light.

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