François Truffaut: The Lost Secret

François Truffaut: The Lost Secret

François Truffaut: The Lost Secret

François Truffaut: The Lost Secret

Synopsis

For François Truffaut, the lost secret of cinematic art is in the ability to generate emotion and reveal repressed fantasies through cinematic representation. Available in English for the first time, Anne Gillain's François Truffaut: The Lost Secret is considered by many to be the best book on the interpretation of Truffaut's films. Taking a psycho-biographical approach, Gillain shows how Truffaut's creative impulse was anchored in his personal experience of a traumatic childhood that left him lonely and emotionally deprived. In a series of brilliant, nuanced readings of each of his films, she demonstrates how involuntary memories arising from Truffaut's childhood not only furnish a succession of motifs that are repeated from film to film, but also govern every aspect of his mise en scène and cinematic technique.

Excerpt

Anne Gillain

It is a great pleasure to see the publication in english of François Truffaut: le secret perdu twenty years after it came out in France. I am most grateful to Alistair Fox for his impeccable work as a translator and for his presentation of my book in a most illuminating introduction. I would like to add a few words, first to explain what prompted me to write this book at the time and also briefly to account for the additional insights time has brought to my understanding of Truffaut’s films.

Over the past fifteen years, a number of important books have been published about Truffaut. Two French publications are particularly noteworthy: one is a 400-page biography by Antoine de Baecque and Serge Toubiana that constitutes an essential source of information about the director’s life. Since Truffaut’s films are profoundly autobiographical, this volume of documented and quotable data is invaluable. the other book, by Carole Le Berre, entitled Truffaut au travail, analyzes in depth the genesis of each film from beginning to end. Carole Le Berre has interviewed many of Truffaut’s artistic collaborators–scriptwriters, photographers, editors, and actors–and discloses significant information about the conception of each film and its progressive elaboration. When these books came out, I was of course interested in the ways they might support my reading of the films. My goal, when I wrote François Truffaut: le secret perdu, was to follow the transformation of experience into fiction through a series of recurring thematic and structural figures. Twenty years later, the analyses of the films have, in my opinion, stood the test of time; they are in fact documented and contextualized by new knowledge in a most stimulating way.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.