Americans, Germans and War Crimes Justice: Law, Memory and "The Good War"

Americans, Germans and War Crimes Justice: Law, Memory and "The Good War"

Americans, Germans and War Crimes Justice: Law, Memory and "The Good War"

Americans, Germans and War Crimes Justice: Law, Memory and "The Good War"

Synopsis

Almost every war involves loss of life of both military personnel and civilians, but World War II involved an unprecedented example of state-directed and ideologically motivated genocide--the Holocaust. Beyond this horrific, premeditated war crime perpetrated on a massive scale, there were also isolated and spontaneous war crimes committed by both German and U.S. forces.

The book is focused upon on two World War II atrocities--one committed by Germans and the other by Americans. The author carefully examines how the U.S. Army treated each crime, and gives accounts of the atrocities from both German and American perspectives. The two events are contextualized within multiple frameworks: the international law of war, the phenomenon of war criminality in World War II, and the German and American collective memories of World War II. "Americans, Germans and War Crimes Justice: Law, Memory, and "The Good War"" provides a fresh and comprehensive perspective on the complex and sensitive subject of World War II war crimes and justice.

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