Teaching Africa: A Guide for the 21st-Century Classroom

Teaching Africa: A Guide for the 21st-Century Classroom

Teaching Africa: A Guide for the 21st-Century Classroom

Teaching Africa: A Guide for the 21st-Century Classroom

Synopsis

Teaching Africa introduces innovative strategies for teaching about Africa. The contributors address misperceptions about Africa and Africans, incorporate the latest technologies of teaching and learning, and give practical advice for creating successful lesson plans, classroom activities, and study abroad programs. Teachers in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences will find helpful hints and tips on how to bridge the knowledge gap and motivate understanding of Africa in a globalizing world.

Excerpt

This book aims to transform the disparate and often ineffective ways that teachers teach Africa in American higher education and to bridge the knowledge gap between the realities and the perceptions about the continent. By focusing our attention on the tertiary level, we expect to have a direct influence on the overall education, media outlook, and societal impressions of Africa in the United States. Therefore, this book encourages a newly engaged global citizenship that recognizes the importance of transnational collaboration with the world’s second-largest and second most populous continent, surpassing one billion people. We respond directly to the ongoing institutional Shif from insular to multifocal education in African studies (Vengroff 2002). Each author encourages an integrated understanding of global culture without neglecting to address how these interactions play out at the regional, national, and local levels.

To challenge Western preconceptions about Africa in order to better equalize the knowledge base, increase accuracy of information, and motivate students is a slow process, but the benefit of thinking about commonalities with the peoples of Africa is a valuable and necessary undertaking in a globalizing world. Divided into 54 recognized sovereign states, the African continent covers 20.4 percent of the Earth’s total surface area. the histories of the West and Africa have been intertwined for more than five centuries. Africa is the birthplace of the human species, the witness to the rise and fall of some of the most powerful and far-reaching empires the world has ever known, and today the site of some of the Earth’s richest natural resources. Africa’s geopolitical relevance and economic and resource potential are affecting a renewed interest in the continent by the U.S. government, which in turn shapes the direction of . . .

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