The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion

The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion

The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion

The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion

Synopsis

What is the future of Continental philosophy of religion? These forward-looking essays address the new thinkers and movements that have gained prominence since the generation of Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, and Levinas and how they will reshape Continental philosophy of religion in the years to come. They look at the ways concepts such as liberation, sovereignty, and post-colonialism have engaged this new generation with political theology and the new pathways of thought that have opened in the wake of speculative realism and recent findings in neuroscience and evolutionary psychology. Readers will discover new directions in this challenging and important area of philosophical inquiry.

Excerpt

Clayton Crockett, B. Keith Putt, and Jeffrey W. Robbins

THE FUTURE HAS always figured prominently in Continental philosophy of religion. Indeed, we might even say that the (relatively short) history of Continental philosophy of religion has been defined by the future. So by way of introduction, our task will be to chart the concept of the future that has animated, inspired, and propelled this burgeoning discourse, which, by our reckoning, has both come into its own and reached a turning point, if not a terminal point or a fork in the road. Put otherwise, by posing the question of the future of Continental philosophy of religion, we are posing not only the possibility of a different future than the specific conception of the future that has heretofore been determinative, but also the possibility of overlapping futures, and thus, an alternative conception of time—not only a future structured by différance, but a plurality of temporalities that makes genuine change and difference possible.

We are asking this question now because now is precisely the time when different futures are appearing on the horizon with the intention of sparking still different thoughts about what the future might hold, and what hold the future might still have on what is a relatively young discourse. So, for instance, what comes next after the death of the generation consisting of Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, and Levinas—the so-called 68ers? Is there a future afterlife for those thinkers who have left such a deep impact on Continental philosophy of religion? Or after the 68ers, or even after the afterlife of the 68ers, what new constellations of thinkers or movements will be most determinative in shaping the future of Continental philosophy of religion? Secondly, is there a politics of Continental philosophy of religion? Does Continental philosophy of religion have its very own political theology? It is with this question that the concepts of liberation and . . .

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