I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom

Synopsis

In this trenchant and often hilarious guide, Patrick Allitt takes the reader along to his course in American history, offering a teacher's-eye view of the undergraduate classroom. The book offers background and guidance to those concerned with the state of higher education today, from educators to general readers, from young faculty facing the classroom for the first time to parents whose children are heading off to college. "Charming, and compelling."--

Excerpt

It’s a great life being a college professor, and the best part of the job is the teaching. I’ve been teaching history to undergraduates for more than twenty years and have always loved it. We professors, however, are expected not only to teach but also to write. the books we write to get tenure and advance our careers are about our disciplines, not about our lives as teachers. It’s strange, isn’t it, that of the tens of thousands of books produced by academics in recent years, hardly any have been about our actual work? As far as I know, there aren’t any about the daily life of a history professor. I mentioned this odd fact to Peter Agree, my friend and editor. “I’ve often thought about writing an account of one semester’s teaching, to record what actually happens in class.” He encouraged me to try. I did, and here is the result, based on a history class I taught at Emory University, entitled, “The Making of Modern America: 1877–2000.”

Professors disagree about the proper relationship between teachers and students, about how to lecture, how to lead a seminar, how to teach writing and use writing assignments, how to give and grade exams, how to counsel students, and how to evaluate class participation. I have opinions on all these subjects, and here I’ll explain and try to justify them by putting them in the context of an actual college course. in addition to describing what happened with a typical class in a typical semester, I’ll throw in some how-to advice and a few “What would you do?” ethical dilemmas based on situations that arose as the weeks went by. a few of these points were debated during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s but much of the day-to-day activity in class bears little or no relation to that debate’s great controversies.

“I’m the teacher, you’re the student.” There are all kinds of implications. First, as the teacher, I know more about the subject than the students do, which is why they have come to class in the first place. They want to learn things they do not yet know. As their teacher, I have power . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.