Early Theological Writings

Early Theological Writings

Early Theological Writings

Early Theological Writings

Synopsis

This volume includes Hegel's most important early theological writings, though not all of the materials collected by Herman Nohl in his definitive Hegels theologische Jugendschriften (Tuebingen, 1907). The most significant omissions are a series of fragments to which Nohl give the general title "National Religion and Christianity" and the essay "Life of Jesus."

Excerpt

Of the translations in this volume, Professor Kroner is responsible for the Fragment of a System and the speech On Classical Studies, while I am responsible for The Positivity of the Christian Religion, the Spirit of Christianity and Its Fate, and the fragment on Love. With the exception of the speech On Classical Studies, the translations have been made from Herman Nohl’s Hegels theologische Jugendschriften (Tübingen, 1907); the page numbers of that edition have been inserted in parentheses for the convenience of readers who wish to refer to the original German. Nohl printed in footnotes a number of passages which Hegel had written and then deleted; these, along with most of the drafts and fragments printed in Nohl’s appendixes, have been omitted from the translation, although a few of them have been used in the explanatory notes. the use of square brackets indicates that what they inclose was not in Hegel’s manuscript; this bracketed material is the translator’s except where otherwise stated. All footnotes originating with the translator are numbered; Hegel’s own footnotes are marked with asterisks.

Although this volume does not comprise all the material collected and published by Nohl, it includes all Hegel’s most important early theological writings. in addition to the omissions mentioned above, I have omitted a series of fragments to which Nohl gave the general title “National Religion and Christianity” and an essay on the “Life of Jesus.” These have not seemed worth translation—the fragments because they are too fragmentary and are concerned in the main with questions treated more systematically and maturely in the essays which I have translated, the “Life of Jesus” because it is little more than a forced attempt to depict Jesus as a teacher of what is in substance Kant’s ethics.

Throughout his life, and not least in his early period when he was . . .

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