The End of the Dream & Other Stories

The End of the Dream & Other Stories

The End of the Dream & Other Stories

The End of the Dream & Other Stories

Synopsis

Owing much to young the author's intimate association with the Omahas at their reservation in eastern Nebraska, the stories were of an Indian cast that perplexed the critics. This title contains nine stories appeared from 1901 to 1905 in the Overland Monthly; five were collected in The Lonesome Trail in 1907.

Excerpt

By Jay Fultz

Natty Bumppo’s noble companion Chingachgook, the fiendish Black Vulture of Nick of the Woods, the mournful Hiawatha and romantic Pocahontas, the Injun Joe of Tom Sawyer’s nightmares—all these literary shades gathered round as John G. Neihardt reviewed a book for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch one day in 1927. “From Cooper onward it is true that the Indian has been misrepresented,” he wrote. “Either he was a painted white man with feathers, as in Cooper, or a bloodthirsty brute, as in the lurid thrillers, or a milksop, as in Longfellow, or an interesting subject for dilletant enthusiasms. the only way to understand a race is to get inside the racial consciousness through intimate and sympathetic contact.”

At the beginning of his career Neihardt had written short stories of sufficient Indian cast to perplex the critics. About two-thirds of the more than thirty stories he produced from 1901 to 1908, when he was in his twenties, were inspired by his association with the Omahas at their reservation near his home in Bancroft, Nebraska. As clerk to a trader, he collected debts from Indians who had been defrauded of their lands by fast-talking bargain . . .

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