Medieval Law: Lawyers and Their Work

Medieval Law: Lawyers and Their Work

Medieval Law: Lawyers and Their Work

Medieval Law: Lawyers and Their Work

Excerpt

The third partida belongs to the genre of ordines iudiciarii, utilitarian “howto” books, elaborated as professionalized law increasingly displaced more informal modes. Alfonso, or rather the notable jurists who confected this partida under his guidance, would have been familiar with the many contemporary works on that topic. The genre culminated in the encyclopedic summa on procedure by the Provençal jurist Guilhem Durand the Elder (1231–96), a contemporary of Alfonso. Durand is called “the Speculator” after his masterwork the Speculum iudiciale or Mirror of the Law, described by R. H. Helmholz as “the most elephantine example” of procedural information, “enormously popular” then.1 The major modern student of such procedural literature in medieval Spain, Jose Bono, notes that Durand’s Speculum was in . . .

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