History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena

History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena

History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena

History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena

Synopsis

..". an excellent translation of an extremely important book." -- The Modern Schoolman This early version of Being and Time (1927) offers a unique glimpse into the motivations that prompted the writing of this great philosopher's master work and the presuppositions that gave shape to it. Theodore Kisiel's outstanding translation permits English readers to appreciate the central importance of this text for the development of Heidegger's thought.

Excerpt

The first thing we must do is to come to an understanding of the theme of this lecture course and the way in which it is to be approached. We shall do this by clarifying its subtitle, “Prolegomena to the Phenomenology of History and Nature.” Taken strictly, the expression refers to that which must be stated and stipulated in advance. in this case, it is a matter of what must be put forward in the beginning in order to be able to do a phenomenology of history and nature. We learn what the prolegomena are from what a phenomenology of history and nature is supposed to be.

In naming history and nature together, we are reminded first of all of the domains of objects which are investigated by the two main groups of empirical sciences (natural science and human science, the latter sometimes being called cultural science or historical science). We tend to understand history and nature by way of the sciences which investigate them. But then history and nature would be accessible only insofar as they are objects thematized in these sciences. But it is not certain whether a domain of objects necessarily also gives us the actual area of subject matter out of which the thematic of the sciences is first carved. To say that the science of history deals with history does not necessarily mean that history as this science understands it is as such also the authentic reality of history. Above all, no claim is made as to whether historiological knowledge of historical reality ever enables us to see history in its historicity. It might well be that something essential necessarily remains closed to the potentially scientific way of disclosing a particular field of subject matter; indeed, must remain closed if the science wishes to perform its proper function. in the case before . . .

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