Collective Action and Property Rights for Poverty Reduction: Insights from Africa and Asia

Collective Action and Property Rights for Poverty Reduction: Insights from Africa and Asia

Collective Action and Property Rights for Poverty Reduction: Insights from Africa and Asia

Collective Action and Property Rights for Poverty Reduction: Insights from Africa and Asia

Synopsis

This volume examines how collective bargaining and property rights, separately and together, influence well-being of the rural poor in Africa and Asia and how they can be strengthened to improve livelihoods.

Excerpt

During the past three decades, major advances have been made in understanding the structure and function of community organizations and the origins and evolution of property rights and access to natural resources. Both local organizing and property rights and access to natural resources have been demonstrated to have profound implications for whether resources such as forests, fisheries, water, and pastures will be sustainably used and managed. Public policy has advanced along with this growing understanding. Similar progress has been made in poverty studies, and we now have a better understanding of the origins, dynamics, and multidimensional aspects of poverty. Policy communities at global, regional, and national levels have renewed and strengthened commitments to poverty reduction in response to findings that economic growth imperatives may leave some people behind.

Despite these advances in research, policy, and practice, contemporary thinking has yet to sufficiently bring the significant lessons from institutions in the natural resources sector to bear on the understanding of poverty and how it can be alleviated. the central focus of this edited volume is the interface between institutions and poverty. This book represents an effort to apply broad lessons and thinking from the vast collective-action and property-rights literature to poverty reduction, in order to provide a deeper understanding of processes and practices relevant to the global poverty-reduction agenda.

The work presented in this book underlines some basic findings. First, the diverse institutions crafted by the rural poor at local levels make possible different forms of organizing. These forms of organizing help the rural poor to manage shocks, reduce vulnerability, or do both; access previously unreachable markets for their products; and facilitate equitable access (including for women and marginalized ethnic groups) to natural resources and to extension services, thus countering elite capture. Second, assets, including property rights to those assets, can limit the rural poor’s ability to participate in collective organizing, even as collective organization provides one way of acquiring assets that would be difficult on an individual basis. Third, community organizing on its own is insufficient. Cooperation among communities and between communities and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.