Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting

Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting

Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting

Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting

Synopsis

This highly insightful and cohesive group of studies reveals the power of political narratives to create conflict and peace.

• Includes contributions from 19 scholars, offering an international perspective on positioning

• Provides detailed case studies

• Presents six tables and four figures

• Offers an extensive reference list at the end of each chapter

Excerpt

Fathali M. Moghaddam and Rom Harré

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad marked Israel’s 60th anniversary
by calling the Jewish state a “stinking corpse” that will soon disappear.

“Those who think they can revive the stinking corpse of the usurping and
fake Israeli regime by throwing a birthday part are seriously mistaken,”
Ahmadinejad said to IRNA, Iran’s official news agency.

Christian Broadcasting Network report

I cannot believe this is happening in America—it shows everything is possi
ble if you work hard. It’s a very happy moment.

A resident of Maryland, originally from West Africa, reacting to the inau
guration ceremony for President Barack Obama
(Tierney 2009)

QUEEN:

Do not for ever with they vail ed lids Seek for thy noble father in the dust. Thou knowest ’tis common. All that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity.

HAMLET:

Ay, madam, it is common.

QUEEN:

If it be so,

Why seems it do particular with thee?

HAMLET:

“Seems,” madam? Nay, it is. I know not “seems.”

Shakespeare, Hamlet, I.2.70–77 . . .

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