Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 1

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 1

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 1

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 1

Synopsis

The PEIRCE EDITION contains large sections of previously unpublished material in addition to selected published works. Each volume includes a brief historical and biographical introduction, extensive editorial and textual notes, and a full chronological list of all of Peirce's writings, published and unpublished, during the period covered.

Excerpt

The writings Peirce himself published run to approximately twelve thousand printed pages. At five hundred pages to the volume, these would make 24 volumes. The known manuscripts that he left unpublished run to approximately eighty thousand handwritten pages. If, on the average, two manuscript pages yield one book page, it would take 80 additional volumes for the unpublished papers and a total of 104 volumes for his complete works. Every previous letterpress edition of Peirce’s writings might therefore fairly be entitled “Selected Papers,” with a subtitle indicating the scope of the selection. The present edition is no exception. What follows is a statement of the aims and editorial policies that have governed the selections for the Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition.

Our primary aim is to facilitate the study of the historical development of Peirce’s thought. The Peirce corpus extends over sixty years, and Peirce returns again and again to his most difficult problems. To understand the positions he finally reached it is necessary to understand the problems he discovered along the way and to see why he felt forced to resolve them as he did. For that reason the present edition brings Peirce’s writings into a single chronological order according to date of publication or, in the case of unpublished papers, date of composition.

To distinguish the papers Peirce published, the place and date of publication are given immediately following the title, while unpublished writings are identified by a manuscript number and the date of composition as noted by Peirce himself or as determined from other evidence. For papers datable only within a year or two, some latitude was taken in placing them in relation to dated papers. The new manuscript numbers were assigned after all of Peirce’s papers, except his correspondence, were reassembled and completely rearranged in . . .

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