Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 3

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 3

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 3

Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition - Vol. 3

Synopsis

The PEIRCE EDITION contains large sections of previously unpublished material in addition to selected published works. Each volume includes a brief historical and biographical introduction, extensive editorial and textual notes, and a full chronological list of all of Peirce's writings, published and unpublished, during the period covered.

Excerpt

Editions differ in what they select and how they arrange and edit their texts. Our selecting, arranging, and editing are guided by the belief that Peirce’s writings are, as he said of Plato’s, “worthy of being viewed as the record of the entire development of thought of a great thinker” and that the development of his thought is eminently worth studying; for Peirce contributed to an exceptionally wide range of disciplines—in mathematics, the natural and social sciences, experimental psychology, and the humanities—while aiming always at eventual synthesis, with a primary focus in logic, more and more broadly conceived.

The need for a comprehensive, chronologically arranged edition of Peirce’s writings began to be acutely felt after Murray Murphey’s The Development of Peirce’s Philosophy appeared in 1961, and in October 1973 some twenty-five Peirce scholars gathered at “The Arisbe Conference” in Milford, Pennsylvania, to discuss the relative merits of several alternative plans for such an edition. The first result of that discussion was that, under the auspices of the Texas Tech University Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism, a small group of scholars spent the summer of 1974 checking an electroprint copy of the Peirce Papers against the originals in the Houghton Library of Harvard University and recording everything evident in the originals but not in the copies, such as watermarks, size and quality of paper, and faint pencil notations, with particular attention to whatever might assist in dating the large number of undated manuscripts. Early in 1975, Indiana University assumed responsibility for the preparation of a new edition. A Center for American Studies was established at Indiana University in Indianapolis, and the Peirce Edition Project was set up under its auspices. Two xerox copies of the electroprint copy were acquired from Texas Tech University—one to remain as arranged in Richard S. Robin’s Annotated Catalogue of . . .

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