The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials

The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials

The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials

The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials

Synopsis

The First Crusade received its name and shape late. To its contemporaries, the event was a journey and the men who took part in it pilgrims. Only later were those participants dubbed Crusaders--"those signed with the Cross." In fact, many developments wit

Excerpt

Both the nine-hundredth anniversary of the First Crusade (1095–1099) and the appearance of a considerable number of texts, translations, and works of scholarship on the history of the First Crusade since the publication of this book in 1971 are more than adequate justification for a second edition. The new edition retains most of the original texts that have made it a useful book for teachers, students, and general readers. It also includes a number of additional texts in translation that historians have come to use routinely in understanding and explaining a series of related events and experiences that had far wider consequences even than the remarkable journey to and conquest of Jerusalem. The new material consists chiefly of sources written in Hebrew and Arabic, although it also includes some new works originally in Latin and one in Old French. Section VI of the first edition, on the evolution of crusading privileges, has been omitted from this edition. In its place I have included three problematic texts that illuminate the complex ways in which ideas related to war against infidels were represented in three different literary genres. The introduction has been extensively revised and expanded, indicating the most important and accessible items of recent scholarship, especially in English but occasionally in other languages. Crusade history has long been an international subject, and not all of the most important work is available in English. The bibliographical essay at the end of the book has also been expanded and revised.

I am grateful to readers of the first edition who have used and commented on it and to several learned societies that have invited me to participate in conferences sponsored by them, particularly the Association for Jewish Studies, for an invitation to comment on a group of papers on the massacres of 1096 presented at the 1995 annual meeting in Boston, and to the Medieval Academy of America, for an invitation to organize and preside at a session on “Clermont and Its Consequences” at its 1996 annual meeting in Kansas City. I am also grateful to the scholars at those meetings and elsewhere who have given help and advice in the preparation of the new edition, particularly Robert Somerville, Thomas G. Waldman, Robert Chazan, Ivan Marcus, David Berger, Richard Landes, James A. Brundage, Bruce Brasington, James M. Powell, Mona Hammad, and James Muldoon.

This book is dedicated to the memory of Donald E. Queller (1925–1995).

Edward Peters . . .

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