Citizens of a Christian Nation: Evangelical Missions and the Problem of Race in the Nineteenth Century

Citizens of a Christian Nation: Evangelical Missions and the Problem of Race in the Nineteenth Century

Citizens of a Christian Nation: Evangelical Missions and the Problem of Race in the Nineteenth Century

Citizens of a Christian Nation: Evangelical Missions and the Problem of Race in the Nineteenth Century

Synopsis

Historian Derek Chang brings together for the first time African American and Chinese American religious histories through a multitiered local, regional, national, and even transnational analysis of race, nationalism, and evangelical thought and practice.

Excerpt

Behold, they are one people, and they have all one language; and
this is what they begin to do: and now nothing will be withholden
from them, which they purpose to do.

Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they
may not understand one another’s speech.

So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all
the earth: and they left off to build the city.

    Genesis 11:6 (ASV)

The vail shall separate unto you between the holy place and the
most holy.

    Exodus 26:33 (ASV)

In the spring of 1882, Fung Chak, a missionary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society (ABHMS), penned a letter to the organization’s Executive Board in New York City from his post in Portland, Oregon. Fung supervised the city’s Chinese Mission School and wrote ostensibly to galvanize support for Baptist efforts among the over eighty thousand Chinese residing in the United States. But he also offered a criticism of the treatment his countrymen faced in America. a decade of virulent anti-Chinese protest had . . .

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