Staffing the Principalship: Finding, Coaching, and Mentoring School Leaders

Staffing the Principalship: Finding, Coaching, and Mentoring School Leaders

Staffing the Principalship: Finding, Coaching, and Mentoring School Leaders

Staffing the Principalship: Finding, Coaching, and Mentoring School Leaders

Synopsis

In today's demanding school environment, many of the principals in your district will retire or leave the job within a few years. Instead of scrambling to fill vacancies, use the ideas and advice in this practical guide to keep a constant supply of high-quality school leaders.

Discover a plan for leadership development that helps you

• Assess and improve your organization's ability to attract and retain good administrators.

• Identify prospective candidates and analyze their leadership qualities.

• Groom future school leaders and support their first years on the job.

• Reduce the stress that principals experience in their daily work.

Handy charts and checklists help you implement your plan. Plus, each chapter brings you up-to-date on innovative ideas such as teaching assistant principals, university partnerships, apprenticeships, and internships.

Excerpt

I’m really worried about the crisis. If we continue to burn out these people,
we’re not going to find leaders.

Glen “Max” McGee, Illinois State School Superintendent
from Dell’Angela (2001), p. 3.

According to the Educational Research Service (ERS, 1999), nearly 40 percent of all public school principals will retire or leave the position for other reasons before 2010. the Bureau of Labor Statistics anticipates the number of available jobs in school administration will grow 10 to 20 percent over the next five years (Institute for Educational Leadership [IEL], 2000, p. 3). Considering there are roughly 93,000 principalships nationwide (IEL, 2000), the vacancy rate in the United States could soar exponentially.

With the average age of a principal being 50 years or older, compounded by fewer people pursuing advancement opportunities leading to a principalship, many districts are scrambling to find strong leaders (ERS, 2000). the elementary principalship alone has experienced a 42 percent turnover rate since 1988. Attrition is expected to remain constant for the next several years. With such significant losses, it should come as no surprise that the greatest deficit of principals is at the high school level.

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