The Psalms in Israel's Worship

The Psalms in Israel's Worship

The Psalms in Israel's Worship

The Psalms in Israel's Worship

Synopsis

One of the most important contributions to our understanding of the psalms, "The Psalms in Israel's Worship" by Sigmund Mowinckel has largely provided the framework and suppositions of modern Psalms study. Fully revised from the original Norwegian edition and now featuring a substantial new foreword by James Crenshaw, this classic work (two volumes in one) argues that the psalms originated in actual temple worship and were used regularly to add drama to Israelbs adoration of Yahweh.Throughout this fascinating work, Mowinckel carefully explores the relationship of the various psalm types to the congregationbs devotional life, including hymns of praise from Israel's national festivals, psalms of lamentation and penitence, and personal or private psalms of thanksgiving. Other topics include the psalms' relationship to prophecy and wisdom, their composition and collection, their style and performance, and the technical terminology involved in Psalms study.Praise for "The Psalms in Israel's Worship"bWe must be very grateful to Mowinckel and all who have helped him to make available this standard work in psalms research to a larger audience.b-- "Journal of Biblical Literature"bA mere review must fail to do justice to this bookbs awesome learning and insight.b-- "Catholic Biblical Quarterly"bBeyond any doubt whatever, this book represents thorough scholarship and has to be taken into consideration by any teacher of the Old Testament.b-- "Princeton Seminary Bulletin"

Excerpt

The history of interpretation of the book of Psalms is a powerful corrective to the illusion of objective scholarship that has long prevailed in scholarly circles. The ardent engagement of readers with the biblical text over the millennia rivals the passion of those who originally composed these words of praise, petition, and instruction. Behind the grammar and syntax of the psalms, interpreters have looked for the plain sense of the ancient linguistic expression (what Jewish rabbis called the pešat), but they have also searched for the deeper meaning, the deraš (sensus plenior in Christian exegesis). Moreover, longing for religious insights concerning themselves and their creator, they have inquired about the social realities that informed the individual psalms. These three interests — literary, theological, and historical — have motivated interpreters of the book of Psalms for more than two thousand years.

1. James Limburg, “Psalms, Book of,” The Anchor Bible Dictionary, ed. David Noel Freedman, vol. 5 (New York: Doubleday, 1992), pp. 522–36; James L. Crenshaw, “Psalms, Book of,” Eerdmam Dictionary of the Bible, ed. David Noel Freedman (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), pp. 1093–95; Erich Zenger, “Psalmenforschung nach Hermann Gunkel und Sigmund Mowinckel,” in Congress Volume: Oslo, 1998, ed. André Lemaire and Magne Saebo, VTSup 80 (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2000), pp. 399–435; and Manfred Oeming, “An der Quelle des Gebets: Neuere Untersuchungen zu den Psalmen,” TLZ 127 (2002): 367–84. Earlier surveys can be found in D. J. A. Clines, “Psalms Research Since 1955:1. The Psalms and the Cult,” Tyndale Bulletin 18 (1967): 103–25 and “Psalms Research Since 1955: II. The Literary Genres,” Tyndale Bulletin 20 (1969): 105–25; B, Feininger, “A Decade of German Psalm-Criticism,” JSOT 20 (1981): 91–103; Audrey R. Johnson, “The Psalms,” in The Old Testament and Modern Study, ed. H. H. Rowley (Oxford: Clarendon, 1951), pp. 162–209; A. S. Kapelrud, “Scandinavian Research in the Psalms after Mowinckel,” ASTI 4 (1965): 74–90; and J. J. Stamm, “Ein Vierteljahrhundert Psalmenforschung,” TRu 23 (1955): 1–68.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.