Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom

Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom

Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom

Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom

Synopsis

A teacher presents a lesson, and at the end asks students if they understand the material. The students nod and say they get it. Later, the teacher is dismayed when many of the students fail a test on the material. Why aren't students getting it? And, just as important, why didn't the teacher recognize the problem? In Checking for Understanding, Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey show how to increase students' understanding with the help of creative formative assessments. When used regularly, formative assessments enable every teacher to determine what students know and what they still need to learn. Fisher and Frey explore a variety of engaging activities that check for and increase understanding, including interactive writing, portfolios, multimedia presentations, audience response systems, and much more. This new 2nd edition of Checking for Understanding has been updated to reflect the latest thinking in formative assessment and to show how the concepts apply in the context of Fisher and Frey's work on gradual release of responsibility, guided instruction, formative assessment systems, data analysis, and quality instruction. Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey are the creators of the Framework for Intentional and Targeted (FIT) Teaching(tm). They are also the authors of numerous ASCD books, including The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More Successful Teaching and Learning and the best-selling Enhancing RTI: How to Ensure Success with Effective Classroom Instruction and Intervention.

Excerpt

It’s breathtaking (and a bit intimidating) to witness the changes in education in this century. The most obvious change, of course, is the role technology has assumed in classrooms. Where once we talked about enhancement, now we recognize that technology is an essential tool for communication and collaboration. Less apparent, at least on the surface, is the way in which data has become an essential element in any conversation about teaching and learning. Most schools have a data room to display information, and nearly every school is required to report these data annually to the community. And our profession’s focus on post-secondary outcomes is causing all of us to consider what happens to our graduates after they leave high school.

But educators recognize that the devices in a classroom, the results on the state achievement test, and the college-and career-readiness standards can’t equip them with the information they need to figure out what to do in the next five minutes. Only formative assessment practices can deliver timely data about what students understand. Without formative assessment data, teaching is aimed at the middle. We’ll never know which students were ready for a stretch, and which needed reteaching. Unfortunately, too often formative assessment has been reduced to two or three district benchmark tests, with little attention given to the data that surround us every day.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.