Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners

Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners

Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners

Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners

Synopsis

Language has always been the medium of instruction, but what happens when it becomes a barrier to learning? In this book, Jane Hill and Kirsten Miller take the reenergized strategies from the second edition of Classroom Instruction That Works and apply them to students in the process of acquiring English. New features in this edition include

• The Thinking Language Matrix, which aligns Bloom's taxonomy with the stages of language acquisition and allows students at all levels to engage in meaningful learning.

• The Academic Language Framework, an easy-to-use tool for incorporating language-development objectives into content instruction.

• Suggestions for helping students develop oral language that leads to improved writing.

• Tips for Teaching that emphasize key points and facilitate instructional planning.

Whether your students are learning English as a second language or are native English speakers who need help with their language development, this practical, research-based book provides the guidance necessary to ensure better results for all.

Excerpt

Language has always been the medium of instruction. As teachers, our automatic use of English helps us to create or produce something new for students. We can create stories, produce explanations, construct meaning when we read, and help students make meaningful connections—all just by opening our mouths.

However, the demographics in our classrooms have changed, and students’ language learning is no longer the sole responsibility of the English as a Second Language teacher. As of the 2010–2011 school year, English language learners made up 13 percent of the student population nationwide (U.S. Department of Education, n.d.). It’s not only students learning English who may need language development; it’s also native-born students who enter school without a firm foundation in English language development at a level necessary to access curriculum content. These students may come from lower socioeconomic or other high-risk environments, where they have fewer verbal interactions with peers or parents and other caregivers, which can result in substandard academic language development. These students are similar to some English language learners because, although they are conversationally proficient, such proficiency is not the only language competency needed for academic success.

What do regular classroom teachers need to know to become better supporters of language development? This second edition of Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners combines the language development tools used in McREL’s training programs with the newly energized strategies from the second edition of Classroom Instruction That Works (Dean, Hubbell . . .

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