Effective Teacher Interviews: How Do I Hire Good Teachers?

Effective Teacher Interviews: How Do I Hire Good Teachers?

Effective Teacher Interviews: How Do I Hire Good Teachers?

Effective Teacher Interviews: How Do I Hire Good Teachers?

Synopsis

Teacher quality is the school-related factor that most affects student learning, so selecting the best candidate for open teaching positions has enormous implications. in Effective Teacher Interviews, Jennifer L. Hindman provides practical advice on how to conduct hiring interviews that reliably predict a teacher's success, including guidance on applying research to the interview process; developing meaningful, legal interview questions; assembling and training an interview team; matching candidates' skills to your schools' needs; and using the best interview strategies. With these tips on refocusing the interview process, you'll be better prepared to select and hire the teachers who will make a positive difference for your students and your school.

Excerpt

When a teacher position opens, consider what your students and school need the new hire to know and be able to do. Think of the teacher selection process as an investment in your school’s success. We’ll start with the research to make the process efficient and effective and then you’ll be able to transfer what you’re doing and learning from one interview to the next. Keep in mind that an instructional leader hires many individual teachers—decisions that matter greatly to the achievement of students and will cost the school system millions of dollars. That money is well spent when effective teachers are selected. Effective Teacher Interviews empowers instructional leaders to positively affect student learning through intentional selection of teaching faculty.

So how do you find good teachers? Despite the farreaching ramifications of any hiring decision, I found that 73 percent of U.S. principals weren’t trained by their school systems in how to conduct fair, legal, and effective interviews (Hindman & Stronge, 2009). Many just borrowed their interview questions from other administrators. of course, professional collaboration is fine if the questions are good, but disastrous if they are poorly constructed or contain impermissible inquiries. in my research, mostly in the discipline of applied psychology and, to a lesser degree, in K–12 literature, I discovered how to refine the teacher interview to . . .

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