Engineering Essentials for STEM Instruction: How Do I Infuse Real-World Problem Solving into Science, Technology, and Math?

Engineering Essentials for STEM Instruction: How Do I Infuse Real-World Problem Solving into Science, Technology, and Math?

Engineering Essentials for STEM Instruction: How Do I Infuse Real-World Problem Solving into Science, Technology, and Math?

Engineering Essentials for STEM Instruction: How Do I Infuse Real-World Problem Solving into Science, Technology, and Math?

Synopsis

Are you looking for ways to incorporate rigorous problem solving in your classroom? Are you struggling with how to include the "E" in your STEM instruction? Here is where to start.

In this practical introduction to engineering for elementary through high school teachers, you'll learn how to create effective engineering-infused lessons that break down the barriers between science, math, and technology instruction. Veteran teacher Pamela Truesdell highlights engineering's connection to 21st century skills and college and career readiness, addresses the Next Generation Science Standards, and walks you through each step of the simple but powerful engineering design process. This is the essential tool of professional engineers and the key to engaging students in hands-on, collaborative projects that ask them to apply content area knowledge to find solutions for real-world problems. A sample lesson, links to additional resources, and guidelines for assessment ensure you'll have the essentials you need to kick off your students' exploration of engineering.

Excerpt

Many educators today say that the traditional approach to teaching science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is outdated, and that the STEM subjects should be taught together rather than as totally separate, “siloed” disciplines. In this publication, we will look at how engineering, the “E” in STEM, can unify all four subject areas.

The best and most engaging way to achieve this unity is through engineering projects that ask students to design solutions for real-world problems. Consider that in the mathematics classroom, problem solving has long been promoted as the way for teachers and students to climb up the Bloom’s taxonomy pyramid. Engineering projects steer students past simple questions of how many apples Sally has and toward authentic problem-solving situations. Whereas students in science class can sometimes get bogged down in following a series of steps to verify an accepted scientific fact, engineering projects open their eyes to the discipline’s true nature. Projects that ask students to apply current knowledge and exploration to new areas in pursuit of the elusive “best” solution make them active players in the world of science. Finally, when students see technology through the lens of engineering, they understand that it’s much more than a synonym for “something that can be plugged in.” Engineering . . .

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