Ensuring Effective Instruction: How Do I Improve Teaching Using Multiple Measures?

Ensuring Effective Instruction: How Do I Improve Teaching Using Multiple Measures?

Ensuring Effective Instruction: How Do I Improve Teaching Using Multiple Measures?

Ensuring Effective Instruction: How Do I Improve Teaching Using Multiple Measures?

Synopsis

Use this publication to explain to everyone in your organization why the best way to evaluate teaching performance is to use a balanced approach that includes multiple measures. Drawing from research conducted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the experiences of nearly 3,000 teachers across the United States, the authors Explain why it's critical to measure effective teaching, ensure high-quality data, and invest in improvement. Describe multiple ways to identify effective teaching and provide teachers with actionable, reliable information they can trust to continuously improve their performance. Provide ideas for getting started with multiple measures at the school and district levels.

Excerpt

As a teacher, how often have you reviewed a day’s lesson in your head and wondered what you could do better next time? How often have you been delighted and inspired when a student suddenly grasps a difficult concept or comes up with a unique solution to a problem?

For Brittany Clark, an English teacher at Middle College High School in Memphis City Schools, every day is an opportunity for growth. When her district launched a new system for teacher development and evaluation—which included classroom observations, measures of student academic growth, and student surveys—she jumped at the chance to reflect on her practice. “I’ve always been really data driven,” she explains, “but I’m even more so now. When I get feedback, I want to know specifics” (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2012a, p. 7).

For example, when her student survey results revealed that she could offer her students more choice among their classroom activities, she decided to give her students more options as long as they completed their original assignments. She also varied the strategies she used to check for understanding, based on feedback from her principal. In addition, she’s used the same observation rubric to observe and mentor new teachers in her building. “I think it’s been really beneficial in working with new teachers because it’s very clear . . .

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