How to Support Struggling Students

How to Support Struggling Students

How to Support Struggling Students

How to Support Struggling Students

Synopsis

If we want our students to succeed, we cannot afford to leave to chance what happens when they do not learn.

In this guide, Robyn R. Jackson and Claire Lambert take you step by step through the process of providing proactive and progressive learning support--what great teachers do to ensure that all students receive the right kind of assistance and to get those who are struggling back on track before they get frustrated and give up. Here, you'll learn how to

• Support students before instruction through acceleration practices, including activating background knowledge, providing advance organizers, and focusing on key vocabulary.

• Support students during instruction by distinguishing between productive and destructive struggle, establishing "red flags" to alert you when a student's learning is headed off course, and delivering targeted interventions that quickly put struggling students back on the path to mastery.

• Support students after instruction by providing appropriate remediation for the few students who have not achieved mastery.

• Create a comprehensive, progressive support plan tailored to your classroom content and the students you teach.

Excerpt

If we want our students to succeed, we cannot afford to leave
to chance what happens when they do not learn.

All teachers have had that moment in the classroom where we’ve just finished explaining what we thought was a simple concept and then see our students staring blankly back, completely lost. We all know the sinking feeling that comes with realizing that, in spite of our best efforts, our students still don’t understand our lesson. And we have all experienced the frustration that comes when students continue to struggle and constantly lag behind. There is curriculum to cover and a test to give, and students just aren’t keeping up.

Often we don’t intervene until after students have shown us that they don’t understand. Then we look for some sort of remediation so they can “relearn” what they failed to absorb the first time, or we slow down and work at a pace we think they can handle. For both teachers and students, it’s a reactive cycle of catching on and catching up that can be as exhausting as it is disheartening.

But what if we could catch students the moment that they began to struggle and help them quickly get back on track? What if we could build-in support systems that would prevent more of them from struggling at all? What if there was something we could do to make student success a lot more likely?

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