Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

Synopsis

"To respect the many differences between people"--this is what Howard Gardner says is the purpose of learning about multiple intelligences (MI) theory, which holds that the human mind is composed of eight intelligences--linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalistic--plus a possible ninth (existential). This updated 3rd edition of Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, Thomas Armstrong's bestselling practical guide for educators, includes two new chapters that address the worldwide reach of MI and rebut some common criticisms of the theory.

This new edition includes updated information and resources throughout the text to help educators at all levels apply MI theory to curriculum development, lesson planning, assessment, special education, cognitive skills, educational technology, career development, educational policy, and more. The book includes dozens of practical tips, strategies, and examples from real schools and districts. Armstrong provides tools, resources, and ideas that educators can immediately use to help students of all ages achieve their fullest potential in life.

Excerpt

This book has emerged from my work over the past 23 years in applying Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences to the nuts-and-bolts issues of classroom teaching. I was initially attracted to MI theory in 1985 when I saw that it provided a language for talking about the inner gifts of children, especially those students who have been given labels such as “LD” and “ADHD” during their school careers (Armstrong, 1987a, 1987b, 1988, 1997, 1999b). It was as a learning disabilities specialist during the late 1970s and early 1980s that I began to feel the need to disassociate myself from what I considered to be a deficit-oriented paradigm in special education. I wanted to forge a new model based on what I plainly saw were the many gifts of these so-called disabled children.

I didn’t have to create a new model. Howard Gardner had already done it for me. In 1979, as a Harvard researcher, Gardner was asked by a Dutch philanthropic group, the Bernard Van Leer Foundation, to investigate human potential. This invitation led to the founding of Harvard Project Zero, which served as the institutional midwife for the theory of multiple intelligences. Although Gardner had been thinking about the notion of “many kinds of minds” since at least the mid-1970s (see Gardner, 1989, p. 96), the publication in 1983 of his book Frames of Mind marked the effective birthdate of . . .

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