Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom

Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom

Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom

Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom

Synopsis

Any teacher can be a master teacher.

So says Robyn R. Jackson, author of the best-selling Never Work Harder Than Your Students and Other Principles of Great Teaching.

In this book for school leaders, Jackson presents a new model for understanding teaching as a combination of skill and will and explains the best ways to support individual teachers' ongoing professional development. Here, you'll learn how to meet your teachers where they are and help every one of them--from the raw novice to the savvy veteran, from the initiative-weary to the change-challenged to the already outstanding--develop the mindset and habits of master teachers. Real-life examples, practical tools, and strategies for managing time and energy demands will help you build your leadership capacity as you raise the level of instructional excellence throughout your school.

To move your school forward, you must move the people in it. If you want a master teacher every classroom, you must commit to helping every teacher be a master teacher. That work begins here.

Excerpt

If we truly believe that all children can learn, then we must
believe that all educators can learn, even in the face of contrary
evidence.

—Roland S. Barth, On Common Ground

My conviction that any teacher can become a master teacher tends to provoke certain reactions. Some people smile indulgently and murmur something about the naiveté of youth. “You’ll learn,” they say. Others are taken aback by the boldness of the statement. “Any teacher?” they ask incredulously, while shaking their heads. “You haven’t met some of the teachers in my building.” Still others eye me suspiciously, as if I am some sort of huckster offering them a sip of snake oil to wash down a handful of magic beans.

Even those who agree with me in principle want to revise the statement. “I’d say most teachers,” they say cautiously. “Not every teacher is going to become a master teacher.”

This is the perspective that defines much of the professional development for educational leaders. It’s why we focus more on helping teachers fix aspects of practice than on helping them pursue limitless excellence. It explains why entire curricula and school programs have been built on the idea that student achievement can somehow be teacher-proofed. And this . . .

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