Reframing Teacher Leadership to Improve Your School

Reframing Teacher Leadership to Improve Your School

Reframing Teacher Leadership to Improve Your School

Reframing Teacher Leadership to Improve Your School

Synopsis

Do you want your school or district to truly become a learning organization? How do you foster lasting and meaningful change? How do you avoid rejection of your new approach to teaching and learning? If you've been involved in a school change effort, you most likely have struggled with these questions. To ease this struggle, Douglas B. Reeves has proposed a new framework to promote effective change efforts through teacher leadership. In this book, you will explore not only cutting-edge research findings, but also practical applications that can help improve student achievement and educational equity. You can learn how to achieve lasting results as an educator and school leader. You can learn from other teacher researchers how to infuse your classroom, school, or district with enthusiasm, meaningful teaching, improved results, and greater satisfaction.

Even as you strive for innovation, you naturally want to avoid having the next new thing become the latest old thing. To achieve lasting change, educators must embrace evidence-based decision making rather than the fact-free debate. Reeves has found that educators more readily accept decisions they disagree with if they believe the decision-making process was fair--not based on opinion or hierarchy. Reeves aims for you to help him build a network of teacher leaders based on this new evidence-based framework that will foster resilient learning organizations. Come along--explore, act, and share.

Excerpt

One cannot read Plato’s accounts of the dialogues of Socrates and believe that teacher leadership is a 21st century idea. From his first days in the Lyceum to the last drop of hemlock and his journey to the Elysian Fields, teacher and leader were one. Even though 21st century educators are fond of the new—and this book will not disappoint in that respect— contemporary authors are disingenuous if they fail to recognize the shoulders on which they stand. Names we know—Diderot, Kant, and Locke from Europe—and teachers whose identities we infer from archaeological records from Africa, Asia, and South America all testify to the truth that teaching and leadership are inseparable qualities. In the 21st century, influential scholars have advocated distributed leadership (Elmore, 2000), implying that hierarchy is less effective than networks (Reeves, 2006b). Whether the perspective is from ancient times, the Renaissance, the previous century, or tomorrow, teachers and school leaders continue to focus on an essential question: how can we transcend the boundaries among teachers, leaders, and political authorities in a way that allows us to nurture, challenge, encourage, and develop every student entrusted to our care? I will attempt to address that question in the following pages.

If teacher leadership is not a new concept, why am I proposing a new framework for teacher leadership? The straightforward, if immodest, response is that although the existing teacher leadership literature contains many compelling anecdotes and rhetorical flourishes, it is strikingly unburdened by evidence and systematic research. In the course of more than 2 million miles of travel to schools around the globe, I have learned at the very least that teachers and school leaders demand practical . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.